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Somewhere, Someplace, Sometime

 Track Listing

  1. SEVENTH SON
  2. LOOKIN AT THE WORLD THROUGH ROSE COLOURED GLASSES
  3. WARM HEARTED BLUES
  4. SOMEWHERE, SOMEPLACE, SOMETIME
  5. SOUP SONG
  6. MY IDEAL
  7. LITTLE JOE FROM CHICAGO
  8. A LITTLE MINOR BOOZE
  9. LAMENT
  10. BIG CHIEF
  11. SCARF DANCE (FOR CLARK TERRY)
  12. LET'S GET LOST
  13. HOT STUFF -TUDO BOM 
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            SYDNEY, Australia – Monday, May 2nd, 2011. Dan Barnett has released his long awaited fifth album, Somewhere, Someplace, Sometime, with the official launch set for June 5th, 2011 on his home turf, the Unity Hall at Balmain.  A follow up to the precious, Bell Jazz Award-nominated album, One for C, this new album is a perfect example of why Dan Barnett is described as a ‘rare talent’ on the Australian and International Jazz circuits. It’s also a wonderful opportunity to experience the superb sounds of a very talented band leader at the top of his game. 

            Produced by Barnett and Anthony Howe, the album is crammed with a carefully selected mix of Swing, Latin, Groove and New Orleans sounds.

            It’s quite impossible not to instantly notice the sheer talent of Barnett. His vocal ability on the song ‘Soup Song’, co-written with the outstanding Andrew ‘Jock’ Robertson, and written in the wake of the closing of the popular Sydney venue of the same name, demonstrates both Barnett’s versatility as a Jazz singer and also his ability to manoeuvre through the chord changes with an almost cheeky pitch precision. 

            Somewhere, Someplace, Sometime showcases the exceptional talent of his all-star musician line up with a generosity that is quintessentially Jazz – Dan really lets the guys shine. The album includes some of the best talent to emerge in Australia in the past twenty years, and includes sublime piano solos of the revered Peter Locke, the infectious bass of award-winning Phil Stack, the exquisite tenor sax of Bradford Child and arguably Australia’s finest big band drummer Andrew Dickeson, to highlight just a few. Barnett utilises the talents of some of Australia most in demand arrangers, namely, George Brodbeck, David Basden and Robertson, the band’s staff arranger. From the brassy punch of the opening track ‘Seventh Son’ it is clear that in this band’s company, the music reigns supreme.  

             

            Dan Barnett’s 5th album is a genuine treat for the ears from the band which could very possibly be Australia’s greatest big band on the circuit today. 

 

Los Angeles Jazz Scene Review

Dan Barnett is a good-humored trombonist who is best known for his ability to play swinging solos. While he has worked with stride pianist Judy Carmichael, he is better known in his native Australia than in the U.S. at this point.Somewhere Someplace Sometime, which is available from www.danbarnett.com.au, is an often-exuberant set filled with exciting solos, inventive playing, and swinging ensembles. Barnett who, in addition to his trombone solos, takes some joyful vocals and shows that Steve Turre is not the only trombonist to also play conch shells, leads a 14-piece little big band. The musicianship is top-notch and the performances are quite spirited. Highlights include Mose Allison's “Seventh Son,” “Looking At The World Through Rose Colored Glasses,” “Little Joe From Chicago,” “A Little Minor Booze” and a tribute to Clark Terry on “Scarf Dance.” While the musicians are mostly unknown in the U.S., Somewhere Someplace Sometime stands as evidence that high quality swinging jazz can be heard virtually everywhere if one looks closely enough. Dan Barnett does an admirable job with his orchestra, making one hope that someday he will be leading a similar band in performances in the United States.

 

 

Critical Jazz Review - Brent Black

 

Big Band on steroids!

 

A vibrant swing, Latin you hear with your hips, an infectious groove and the New Orleans sound done to perfection. Dan Barnett is but one of the stellar talents that have been a well kept secret in Australia. Barnett's fifth album has this trombonist, singer and band leader not to mention the entire band firing on all cylinders with a foot to the floor approach missing from most big bands today.

 

Kicking the party off with the classic "Seventh Son" the horn charts are off the hook and Barnett's vocals are done to an old school crooner like perfection that makes old school new cool. "Looking At The World Through Rose Colored Glasses" is a smoker and continues to set up a non stop sonic party with great charts and stellar solos from this most engaging of big bands. "Let's Get Lost" swings with warm and vibrant vocals and a big band able to shift musical dynamics on the fly to create just the right amount of excitement and flavor without ever hitting the self indulgent level most big bands ultimately find themselves. "Hot Stuff - Tudo Bom" closes this release with style, flair and panache.

 

An infectious and intoxicating journey into the land of rhythm and groove, Some Where Some Place Some Time is a musical triumph of what was but...brought back and reinvented by drawing upon a myriad of genres and styles to make Dan Barnett's musical voice truly unique. Time and space limit my ability to express my true appreciation for just how well this band swings. If a chain is only as strong as the weakest link then there are clearly no weak links here! From Laura Kahle to JC Stylles to Andrew Dickeson and now Dan Barnett - The Australian jazz scene is exporting some of the finest jazz available anywhere!

 

 Sydney Morning Herald Review

 

 If you want music to pick you up out of the day-to-day torpor and give you a hefty shot of ebullience, this should do the trick. Some of Dan Barnett’s singing might have a retro-jazz styling about it but it is delivered with the conviction of now, not to mention having charm, zest and good humour. His trombone playing shares those qualities and adds a burnished tone and an engaging blend of swagger and non-maudlin melancholy. His well-honed big band delivers the snappy arrangements with verve and contains many worthy soloists who ride the rhythmic tide produced by bassist Phil Stack and drummer Andrew Dickeson. John Shand